How long is too long for an employer to get back to you on an application?

@M

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What's the longest a business/organization has taken to get back to you on a job application?

I just got a phone call about a job I applied for about 2-1/2 months ago, at a local hospital, and she asked me if I was still interested, and, I'm like, no, I accepted a job offer from my current employer (you know, one of those strange individuals that actually responds to applications in a prompt and courteous manner because they actually want to hire people), and have been working for them this whole time that you were twiddling your thumbs thinking about it, I'm not available. (Okay, I said it to her nicer than that.)

If I don't hear back from an employer in 1-2 weeks after applying and submitting my resume, I write it off and assume they either don't want to hire me or found someone else better.
 

The Chief

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Years ago I applied for a job and after two interviews I didn’t hear back for a month or two. I had taken a job that wasn’t going anywhere but got me out of the house making a few bucks. I remember getting the call from them while I was at the placeholder job asking if I was still interested. I went into the break room to take the call and was like “heck yeah!” when they offered me the job. Think my boss heard me through the wall, good thing he’s a friend.

Getting that job ultimately opened up a new career and put me on the map. It lead to me buying a house and getting an even better job several years later. I realize this sort of thing doesn’t happen all the time and count my blessings. I didn’t have any of the skills they were looking for but a good head on my shoulders and a willingness to learn. They liked that they could train me as they saw fit and things worked out really well.

If I learned anything from this experience it’s to value and sell yourself. I’m a high school grad and don’t carry and additional certifications or degrees, and yet I’m still out here killing it.
 

AppleiDog

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What's the longest a business/organization has taken to get back to you on a job application?

I just got a phone call about a job I applied for about 2-1/2 months ago, at a local hospital, and she asked me if I was still interested, and, I'm like, no, I accepted a job offer from my current employer (you know, one of those strange individuals that actually responds to applications in a prompt and courteous manner because they actually want to hire people), and have been working for them this whole time that you were twiddling your thumbs thinking about it, I'm not available. (Okay, I said it to her nicer than that.)

If I don't hear back from an employer in 1-2 weeks after applying and submitting my resume, I write it off and assume they either don't want to hire me or found someone else better.
Having been in recruitment/HR usually you would want to get the process of hiring someone out the way asap because it takes quite alot of time.

But there have been times where a job has been open people have applied and for some upper management reasons has been prosponed, so you still have a pool of candidates from before when it opens back up a month or so down the line.
 

fake

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I applied to be a producer for Oxfam. They called me a year later and asked if I were still interested. I'm assuming they hired someone else and they ended up leaving, so they just went back to the pile of candidates.
 

100proof

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For private sector jobs, taking that long usually means their first choice fell through (couldn't negotiate salary, background check failed, they realized the person was woefully underqualified, etc.).

Most public sector jobs take forever to fill though.
 

SignOfZeta

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Between the application and actually starting work at my current job the wait was…nearly a year. At least 10 months. I wasn’t even dealing with the same recruiter anymore by that point. Some companies are slow.
 

neo_moe

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Our hiring process can be slow, but at least we are in communication with the candidates throughout it.
 

Ajax

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I imagine it varies by industry quite a bit. In tech, you have to be quick, or you're gonne be left with nothing but McDonald's toys in your butt.
 

StevenK

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I've never not been told if I got the role within a fortnight
 

Tarma

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While some UK companies I've dealt with have been a little slow once the process has started (after being selected for interview), my mind has been blown by how inept and insensitive NA businesses are when it comes to hiring.

Generally I give firms two to three weeks and then write the application off after that. I know some firms won't contact candidates until after the closing date, but they're generally in the minority I find.
 

NeoSneth

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i got calls for years and years to be a lifeguard. I was like, no, I'm a 30 year old adult now.

If you already accepted a position, but the one you want eventually came later, you can absolutely leave. I've seen that happened a few times.
 
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Syn

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A few places I've worked they'd hold onto applications for 12 months. By that time any decent applicants have found a job but that was corporate policy.
 

Tw3ek

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When I was in high school, I put in an application to work at Target. 5 years later, they told me that they were going to go with somebody else, which I had kinda figured by that point.
 

mjmjr25

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I applied to be a producer for Oxfam. They called me a year later and asked if I were still interested. I'm assuming they hired someone else and they ended up leaving, so they just went back to the pile of candidates.
I hire for a hospital and this. People get hired and maybe they no-show orientation, or they start out and it just doesn't work out. Rather than re-post and wait for new applications we will always call any other viable candidates we had first.
 

LoneSage

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I hire for a hospital and this. People get hired and maybe they no-show orientation, or they start out and it just doesn't work out. Rather than re-post and wait for new applications we will always call any other viable candidates we had first.
Hey big homie, it's me, LoneSage. Everything going OK. Life update, doing good.
 

LoneSage

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Years ago I applied for a job and after two interviews I didn’t hear back for a month or two. I had taken a job that wasn’t going anywhere but got me out of the house making a few bucks. I remember getting the call from them while I was at the placeholder job asking if I was still interested. I went into the break room to take the call and was like “heck yeah!” when they offered me the job. Think my boss heard me through the wall, good thing he’s a friend.

Getting that job ultimately opened up a new career and put me on the map. It lead to me buying a house and getting an even better job several years later. I realize this sort of thing doesn’t happen all the time and count my blessings. I didn’t have any of the skills they were looking for but a good head on my shoulders and a willingness to learn. They liked that they could train me as they saw fit and things worked out really well.

If I learned anything from this experience it’s to value and sell yourself. I’m a high school grad and don’t carry and additional certifications or degrees, and yet I’m still out here killing it.
This post made me smile in real life, on my face.
 

LoneSage

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my mind has been blown by how inept and insensitive NA businesses are when it comes to hiring.
The horror stories - which seem to just be normal stories in America - are just that: horror. The worker having leverage is a great feeling.
 

StevenK

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I hire for a hospital and this. People get hired and maybe they no-show orientation, or they start out and it just doesn't work out. Rather than re-post and wait for new applications we will always call any other viable candidates we had first.
How shit tier employee levels are you prepared to accept, when you're fishing in the barrel of people who either couldn't find another job in the last 12 months, or are prepared to fuck off a job that they've had for less than 12 months to join you?

Answer: the kind of employees who no-show orientation.
 

SignOfZeta

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How shit tier employee levels are you prepared to accept, when you're fishing in the barrel of people who either couldn't find another job in the last 12 months, or are prepared to fuck off a job that they've had for less than 12 months to join you?

Answer: the kind of employees who no-show orientation.

Around here healthcare workers are in serious demand. You may receive offers from three places at once with no idea which one is best, causing you to lead the others on as long as possible, up to starting date, to protect your own interests. It’s rude, but it’s not an ideal situation for anyone.
 

StevenK

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Around here healthcare workers are in serious demand. You may receive offers from three places at once with no idea which one is best, causing you to lead the others on as long as possible, up to starting date, to protect your own interests. It’s rude, but it’s not an ideal situation for anyone.
I guess I'm more relaxed about employers treating candidates like shit if candidates are also treating employers like shit.
 

skate323k137

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How shit tier employee levels are you prepared to accept, when you're fishing in the barrel of people who either couldn't find another job in the last 12 months, or are prepared to fuck off a job that they've had for less than 12 months to join you?

Answer: the kind of employees who no-show orientation.
What about people holding less than ideal positions elsewhere but still doing their jobs? That's a lot of people. I got a call 2 months after an interview and I was still working at my other job I had kept for years. The new offer was better so I put in proper notice.

Not every job seeker is a desperate unemployed person.
 

StevenK

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What about people holding less than ideal positions elsewhere but still doing their jobs? That's a lot of people. I got a call 2 months after an interview and I was still working at my other job I had kept for years. The new offer was better so I put in proper notice.

Not every job seeker is a desperate unemployed person.
I'd appreciate you not pulling apart my sweeping generalisations with specific worked examples, thanks.
 

Neodogg

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I imagine it varies by industry quite a bit. In tech, you have to be quick, or you're gonne be left with nothing but McDonald's toys in your butt.
Sounds like you are saying this likes it’s a bad thing…
 
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