The Comic Book Thread

oliverclaude

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If you haven't read Invisibles yet, that's even better.
I haven't, indeed, thank you for your tip STK... and the confidence that I could accept the challenge to approach such a content monster. I tend to read one or two issues per day, but from more than one run at the same time. I coupled DP with Lee/Ditko's first Strange issues, which are fascinating by the way, kind like entering a time capsule in real time. Since there's still a lot of Dr. Strange left and Ditko hooked me up for good, I already bought Morrison's Animal Man. Chaz Truog's old-school art caught my attention immediately. So this will be my next Morrison to go. Now, I still have to buy The Invisibles, yet. Coupling it with anything is probably not a good idea, though hahah. But I'm already curious how much Matrix will become visible then.
 

SouthtownKid

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with Lee/Ditko's first Strange issues, which are fascinating by the way, kind like entering a time capsule in real time.
That first Strange Tales run is the best Doctor Strange has ever been. I love that several issue story that begins with Strange on the run from Mordo. Unfortunately, once Ditko left (he'd actually been plotting the stories as well), it never really was the same... although the Steve Englehart/Frank Brunner run from the '70s is pretty good. I think they actually were doing the drugs people wrongly assumed Ditko had been on.

Also, if you like Troug on Animal Man, check out his earlier work on the Marvel Epic series Coyote, by him and writer Steve Englehart. Actually, it started in a story serialized in Eclipse Magazine (drawn by frequent Englehart collaborator Marshall Rogers), before getting it's own book at Epic. The great Steve Leialoha drew the first two issues, but then Troug drew the rest of the series. It was an interesting book. And now that I think about it, Ditko did a back-up story that ran through a bunch of issues.
 

profholt82

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One of the best ones I read last year was a trade by Garth Ennis called Sara. It was about a group of female Russian snipers in WWII. It was loosely based on a true story I believe. Great story. I generally like Ennis' stuff that I've read, particularly his Punisher stuff. Although while he's probably most famous for Preacher and The Boys, I've never read those.
Sara-TPB.png



I ordered a new one from Ed Brubaker called Friday a little while back because I usually like his stuff too. My local shop said it's been delayed though, so it may be a bit before I get it. Apparently it's available digitally, but I'm waiting for the trade.

 

oliverclaude

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Once again, thank you for your insights and recommendations STK. They're very much appreciated.
That first Strange Tales run is the best Doctor Strange has ever been. I love that several issue story that begins with Strange on the run from Mordo. Unfortunately, once Ditko left (he'd actually been plotting the stories as well), it never really was the same...
Yeah, Dean Mullaney's preface in my edition mentions that Steve Ditko was given credit in #135 as the author. There's probably a reason why, even though in different variations, Ditko and Strange share the same first name, hehe. The atmosphere is so dense in those issues, I'll always marvel (pun intended, I guess) how it was possible to achieve this density and depth using such bright and elemental colors. It's ingenious, kind like reflections of neon-signs from the past in little pools of rainwater on a nightly street, used to fill the perfectly sized frames. It works perfectly with the script and I don't understand the reproach towards its descriptive nature. It creates a unique flow in my opinion, similar to the whispered thoughts in Lynch's Dune. In fact, I often read them this way.
 

SouthtownKid

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One of the best ones I read last year was a trade by Garth Ennis called Sara. It was about a group of female Russian snipers in WWII. It was loosely based on a true story I believe. Great story. I generally like Ennis' stuff that I've read, particularly his Punisher stuff. Although while he's probably most famous for Preacher and The Boys, I've never read those.
Sara-TPB.png



I ordered a new one from Ed Brubaker called Friday a little while back because I usually like his stuff too. My local shop said it's been delayed though, so it may be a bit before I get it. Apparently it's available digitally, but I'm waiting for the trade.

Speaking of Ennis, he just had a Peacemaker comic this week at DC. I guess to help promote the new show.

I was really enjoying it as a newly revealed backstory for the character, very much in line with Ennis' handling of Punisher. But then I got to the end and found out it was a one-shot. Meaning, no more to follow. I thought this was the beginning of a new series. That sucked all the enjoyment out of it. As a set up to an ongoing, it was fairly strong. As a stand alone story, it was pretty pointless.

I want to try that Sara comic, though. Ennis really has an affinity for war comics. If you haven't already, you should check out his War Stories series from DC/Vertigo. A great anthology teaming him with a bunch of fantastic artists, many from 2000AD like Cam Kennedy.
 

oliverclaude

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After hearing about raving opinions on Tom King's run of Mister Miracle, I decided to try it myself. With mixed results... In my opinion King tried hard to be original, even a bit controversial, as if he was saying 'hey, this one you'll either love or hate, but you won't be indifferent about it'. Indifferent it is, though. The whole concept felt like Adrian Tomine would write a super hero story. Or a story about a comic buff who just imagines to be a super hero meanwhile being forced to face adulthood? Killing and Dying was probably a reference here. There's a bit of Trondheim's/Sfar's Dungeon humor thrown in, too. Nice inspirations, but not exactly original. Gerad's art was ok, but due to stern nine panel splitting he didn't get a chance to develop anything noteworthy. But that's all right and in the end, King's run would feel comfortably middle-rate, if there wasn't something seriously fake about it...

You see, King's former CIA, he "fought terrorists" and used this comic to tell about it. About the difficulties of a soldier to unite a thankless job with domestic everyday life. Again through inspirations. Like he saw The Hurt Locker about as many times as Howard Hughes screened Ice Station Zebra. It's ok, I like good references, but not if someone misses the point. Bigelow questioned the war, but also the world protected by it. King doesn't question the latter at all, he gives it a romanticising praise. All his clever allusions and citations end up praising Truth, Justice and the American Way all over again, as if King's Mister Miracle escaped Kirby's creation and came back as another Superman. Or better yet, just another incel wearing an "S" tee and a lot of pregnant with meaning lines to share. I hope King's Mister Miracle is just a one-time-only binge, if it's teh future of super hero stories, I'll pass.
 

oliverclaude

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I read two shorter Batman stories, first was The Cult, second was Gothic. The former was ok, felt like an antithesis to DKR, like Blackfire was Starlin's comment, even a portrayal of Miller's Batman creation. Envy? Perhaps. There's also an ongoing opinion about Starlin, according to which he's not as good as he thinks he is. After reading The Cult, I can understand why. Wrightson's art was more than gorgeous, though, so I don't regret reading it.

Gothic however was love at first sight and it's almost scary how Morrison's stories appeal to me. This time with Klaus Janson, whose art is absolutely ingenious in my opinion. Among many excellent things in this comic book, there's also a spectacular fight including a metro station with an approaching train, which was ripped off for The Matrix. Needless to say, the comic book version is better. Looking forward to see more stolen goods coming, as I go along with Morrison's bibliography.

For desert I had me Chester Brown's Ed the Happy Clown, wich is nothing less but a masterpiece. And a funny one at that. And an engaging one too, as it literally forces you to go back, check former pages again, recollect facts and traces, only to discover... that it all works out in the end. Like clockwork. An awesome discovery for a comic book neophyte like me.
 

SouthtownKid

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I read two shorter Batman stories, first was The Cult, second was Gothic. The former was ok, felt like an antithesis to DKR, like Blackfire was Starlin's comment, even a portrayal of Miller's Batman creation. Envy? Perhaps. There's also an ongoing opinion about Starlin, according to which he's not as good as he thinks he is. After reading The Cult, I can understand why. Wrightson's art was more than gorgeous, though, so I don't regret reading it.
I didn't enjoy The Cult when it first came out, but upon rereading, it makes a lot more sense within the context of Starlin's ongoing Batman run of the time. Which I also didn't enjoy at the time it came out, but which I now think is incredibly underrated, as short as it is.

As for Gothic, there's a book critically analyzing Morrison's early comic work from Zenith to Doom Patrol (and Including Gothic). It's worth reading.

https://www.amazon.com/Grant-Morris...nt+morrison+non+fiction,stripbooks,217&sr=1-6
 

famicommander

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Check out this letter Dwayne McDuffie sent to Marvel back in the day:
dwaynemcduffie.jpg

(Night Thrasher and Rocket Racer at least are actual characters)

A few years later he would found Milestone Comics, create hundreds of characters, and go on to be a highly successful screenwriter, showrunner, and producer for animated DC films and TV shows including Static Shock, Justice League and Justice League Unlimited, Teen Titans, Justice League Doom, Crisis on Two Earths, and All-Star Superman. He also had runs at both Marvel and DC writing and editing on Batman, Firestorm, Damage Control, JLA, Avengers, Captain Marvel, Iron Man, Kid Flash, and Fantastic Four comics among others.

It also turns out that he was the half brother of Keegan Michael-Key, but sadly Dwayne died before he or Keegan were told about it.
 

SouthtownKid

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Welp. Amazon has fucked up comixology, possibly beyond repair. They've turned it into a complete shitshow. Nearly unusable. There go my American comic books.
 

Arcademan

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Legendary comic book creator George Pérez says he has inoperable cancer

George Pérez in 2019

George Pérez in 2019
The comic book community is expressing its love and appreciation for George Pérez today, after the writer and artist who worked on some of the biggest and most popular comic books of all time announced that he’s been diagnosed with inoperable Stage 3 pancreatic cancer and is only expected to live for another “six months to a year.”
Pérez hasn’t actually worked in comics for a few years, having retired due to health problems from everything but convention appearances and commissioned drawings, but the impact of his best work is still felt today. In the early ‘80s, after working at Marvel on The Avengers, the Fantastic Four, and on the big cosmic crossover “The Korvac Saga,” Pérez went to DC to work with writer Marv Wolfman to launch The New Teen Titans.

It ended up being one of DC’s biggest books of the era, and the one that introduced now-beloved characters like Raven, Starfire, Cyborg, and Deathstroke The Terminator. Earlier this year, Wolfman and Pérez even appeared as themselves on an episode of Teen Titans Go! on Cartoon Network.

Impressed by their work on The New Teen Titans, DC then let Wolfman and Pérez loose on one of the all-time great comic book events and the one that established the model for a lot of comic book events going forward: Crisis On Infinite Earths. The miniseries blew up DC’s overly complicated multiverse and gave Pérez a chance to draw pretty much every DC character ever, and he even got an Easter egg shoutout when The CW’s superhero shows staged their own version of Crisis On Infinite Earths.

In the announcement about his diagnosis, Pérez says that he decided to forego “chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy” in favor of spending the time he has left with his family, friends, and fans. He plans to “coordinate one last mass book signing” for people and hopes to make one last public appearance” so as many fans as possible can get photographs with him—”with the proviso that I get to hug each and every one of them,” he adds.
As mentioned in the Neal Adams thread, George Perez finally lost his battle with pancreatic cancer:

 

FinalbossNYC

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I first met George at my local shop as a kid in NYC, he signed several copies of Infinity Gauntlet 1 for me and some Titans books, asked me what I liked about comics I told him the beautiful line art he then he told me to draw everyday. Years later I tabled near him and Neal Adams they both separately walked over to my table and bestowed too much kindness on to me.

George was always donating to charities and inspired many like me to do the same he and Neal have left their marks on peoples hearts as well as an industry that will never honor them properly like many other creators before them. You will be missed sir.
 

Arcademan

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He didn't lose his fight. When he died, the cancer also died. That is called a draw.
I stand corrected, sir. Still a downer personally for me since my brother died the same way a few years back.
 

SouthtownKid

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I stand corrected, sir. Still a downer personally for me since my brother died the same way a few years back.
I'm really sorry to hear that. But rather than thinking of it as him losing a battle, honor your brother as a hero. He fought the most deadly disease on record to a standstill.
 

LoneSage

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Welp. Amazon has fucked up comixology, possibly beyond repair. They've turned it into a complete shitshow. Nearly unusable. There go my American comic books.
I logged into my iPad for the first time in forever and looked at some comics I downloaded from there. But now I can't buy anything. I chalked it up to China being China. But what problems do you have?
 
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