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Thread: Issues with including a PSU enclosed in a CMVS system.

  1. #1
    B. Jenet's Firstmate
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    Issues with including a PSU enclosed in a CMVS system.

    Working on building myself CMVS 2.0 and I want to include the PSU in the enclosure and feed AC directly into the back rather than rely on wall-warts and in-line power bricks.

    Why? It's convenient, keeps cable mess down, and a moron friend fried the motherboard in my CMVS once because there are plenty of 12v PSU's that use the exact same 2.5mm barrel plug my 5v CMVS uses. I would like to avoid this in the future.

    The PSU I'm thinking is a 5v 7a PSU (I know, overkill on the amps, but it's incredibly compact) from an older model Apple TV, so it's high quality, low heat, and was already shoved inside a super tight enclosure right next to the apple TV motherboard so I imagine it produces relatively low RF interference.

    So what I wonder, is interference going to be a problem with the NeoGeo? if I shield it with well am I ok? Is AC current running directly into the CMVS going to be a problem (outside of shoddy workmanship, I know what I'm doing with AC and it will be well protected.)

    Here's the PSU next to a MV-1fz

    It doesn't have any kind of metal shielding on it, just this plastic wrap around stuff. I was planning to mount it underneath the board with a bit of ventilation (apple TV's have zero ventilation)

    Anyone see any issues with this?
    -Finch

  2. #2
    B. Jenet's Firstmate
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    UPDATE: While I haven't gotten a definitive answer in the various places I posted this, some people did clear some things up. For anyone wondering.

    • The plastic on the AppleTV PSU is shielding, so it is a shielded PSU and should be fine crammed next to other stuff as it was in the apple TV
    • If you are going to cram a PSU into a tight enclosure with other boards, a paper-foil or plastic type shield is probably better than a metal cage for interference
    • It might be an issue if it was going in next to something that ran at a higher clock frequency than the NeoGeo.
    -Finch

  3. #3
    Zero's Tailor
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    Sorry bit late to this, But yeah just shield the PSU and keep the AC cables away from everything else and it should be fine.
    Inside a enclosure I would recommend plastic unless you are building an all metal enclosure.

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    B. Jenet's Firstmate
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    Enclosure is going to be wood top, and metal bottom plate. Not sure where that puts me, but where I plan to mount the PSU it will be under the back of the motherboard, but the AC cables won't really be running under the board. Since it has the shield on it already it's sounding like it should be fine.
    -Finch

  5. #5
    JammaNationX
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    You could always use one of those buck converters that are set to 5v output and they can plug in other voltage PSUs and it will still output 5v.

  6. #6
    B. Jenet's Firstmate
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xian Xi View Post
    You could always use one of those buck converters that are set to 5v output and they can plug in other voltage PSUs and it will still output 5v.
    Wasn't aware of these, got a link to an example? that could be nice too. Gives a bit of protection if someone fucks up on the wrong PSU.
    -Finch

  7. #7
    Crazed MVS Addict
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    Here's one on ebay https://www.ebay.com/itm/172358062967 This takes up to 24v and outputs 5v 5A
    There's also guides for making your own if you're more inclined to do that.

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