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Thread: The bad battery thread

  1. #451
    Neo Bubble Buster
    Hairy Otter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartre View Post
    I contacted the seller yesterday to work something out; I'd rather just fix it and be done.
    but what's a fair price for a board with this kind of damage?
    Is the board running elseways, or has it other issues as well?
    I've had boards that looked worse, but run just fine after cleaning and doing a battery mod.

    I hunt down and bridge broken track and re-flow ugly looking legs (like on the NEO-ZMC2 in your picture) with plenty of "no clean" flux, and clean the whole area with rubbing alcohol. I don't know if this is the best way to do this, but my first repair three years ago is stil up and running and I hope it will be for a long time.
    If anybody has a better way of cleaning I'm happy to hear it.

  2. #452
    Thou Shalt Not
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    xsq's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartre View Post
    does it matter what kind of vinegar I use? I don't have any regular white.
    DON'T USE VINEGAR. [I know I posted about doing just that before - but I know better now.]

    Do as follows:
    1. Try to clean the spot as much as you can with a dry cloth and then some rubbing alcohol.
    2. Mix baking soda with some water to a paste and apply it to the damaged parts with a toothbrush.
    3. Let it sit for a short while (20-30 Min.).
    4. Clean with distilled/demineralized water.
    5. Dry the board. (Hand-dry with a clean and soft cotton cloth. Easiest way to make sure the board is really really dry is heating your oven to ca. 70ーC, then turn it off (!) and put the PCB inside over night.)

    Here's why: Mixing an acid (vinegar) with a base (leakage) could lead to a chemical reaction that will further damage your board. Also the proportions of battery leak to vinegar would have to be perfect to really neutralize the leakage and not leave some of the vinegar on the board that will eat through the metal even faster. Backing soda (sodium bicarbonate) is amphoteric, so it will neutralize bases and acids.

    Thanks to the people schooling me on this. Read further here and here.



    Quote Originally Posted by Hairy Otter View Post
    Is the board running elseways, or has it other issues as well?
    I've had boards that looked worse, but run just fine after cleaning and doing a battery mod.
    this.

  3. #453
    Super Spy Agent
    bartre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hairy Otter View Post
    Is the board running elseways, or has it other issues as well?
    I've had boards that looked worse, but run just fine after cleaning and doing a battery mod.

    I hunt down and bridge broken track and re-flow ugly looking legs (like on the NEO-ZMC2 in your picture) with plenty of "no clean" flux, and clean the whole area with rubbing alcohol. I don't know if this is the best way to do this, but my first repair three years ago is stil up and running and I hope it will be for a long time.
    If anybody has a better way of cleaning I'm happy to hear it.
    Well there's some graphical fuckery.
    But as far as I know, that could also be caused by a loose/dirty cart slot.

    To repair the traces, should I run wires, or is it better to just scrape the mask and flow some solder?

  4. #454
    Thou Shalt Not
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartre View Post
    To repair the traces, should I run wires, or is it better to just scrape the mask and flow some solder?
    I would run wires and connect the components directly (and not try to just bridge the broken part of the trace(s)). Should be less work and surer to succeed.

  5. #455
    Cheng's Errand Boy
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    Man, it's good to be back, and what a fantastic thread. I think I completely missed this one when I was previously active on here, but as I'm preparing to spend more time with the Neo, I got to thinking I should look into tidying it up a bit (some slots work better than others, but it mostly just needs a good cleaning). Now I know what I'll be checking on first!

  6. #456
    Bashful Neophyte
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    Quote Originally Posted by xsq View Post
    DON'T USE VINEGAR. [I know I posted about doing just that before - but I know better now.]

    Do as follows:
    1. Try to clean the spot as much as you can with a dry cloth and then some rubbing alcohol.
    2. Mix baking soda with some water to a paste and apply it to the damaged parts with a toothbrush.
    3. Let it sit for a short while (20-30 Min.).
    4. Clean with distilled/demineralized water.
    5. Dry the board. (Hand-dry with a clean and soft cotton cloth. Easiest way to make sure the board is really really dry is heating your oven to ca. 70ーC, then turn it off (!) and put the PCB inside over night.)

    Here's why: Mixing an acid (vinegar) with a base (leakage) could lead to a chemical reaction that will further damage your board. Also the proportions of battery leak to vinegar would have to be perfect to really neutralize the leakage and not leave some of the vinegar on the board that will eat through the metal even faster. Backing soda (sodium bicarbonate) is amphoteric, so it will neutralize bases and acids.

    Thanks to the people schooling me on this. Read further here and here.




    this.
    thanks for this xsq. just starting to clean for the first time and this helps alot!

  7. #457

    bwi's Avatar
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    can anyone tell me if i just have to remove the 470 resistor on this board or is it one where you have to remove and reuse the 1S1588 diode as well.
    I've been on JNX and no luck also i found a video with a very similar board https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnDsyL5xIEc

    I've also took a picture just to show what i have

    20180127_122155.jpg
    George is mine

  8. #458
    Bashful Neophyte

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    Hi all,i have an MV-1C board with the vertical battery Holder. How easy are these ones to swap out, it's a coin type. So is it a case of just swapping for a new one? If so what battery would be suitable. Thanks

  9. #459
    Cheng's Errand Boy

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    Quote Originally Posted by gamelife00 View Post
    Hi all,i have an MV-1C board with the vertical battery Holder. How easy are these ones to swap out, it's a coin type. So is it a case of just swapping for a new one? If so what battery would be suitable. Thanks
    A lot of people opt to remove the charging circuit and switch to a standard CR2032 and a basic coin cell socket. I opted for an SMD coin cell socket and to still use the LR2032 rechargeable battery personally.

  10. #460
    New Challenger
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    Quote Originally Posted by MobiusStripTech View Post
    A lot of people opt to remove the charging circuit and switch to a standard CR2032 and a basic coin cell socket. I opted for an SMD coin cell socket and to still use the LR2032 rechargeable battery personally.
    Would doing this be as easy as replacing batteries in snes carts or putting a socket in a dreamcast for easy battery removal?

  11. #461
    Cheng's Errand Boy

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    Essentially. The level of difficulty just depends on the socket you intend to install and your skills. The MV1C has a non-standard pin layout which basically means you probably won't find a direct fit socket. In most cases you can attach a component lead to the socket pins and connect those to the original solder points or even alternative points.

    Overall it really isn't difficult to do this though.

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